Silent e    - word attack

Lesson_Title: Silent e    - word attack
Student_Teacher: Patti Havel
Draft: 1
Grade: 2
Date_Received: 3/13/00
Date_Implemented: 3/22/00
Coop_Teacher: Mrs. Martin
Approval:
Lesson_Time: 40 min.
Date: 3/13/00
Time: 8:57:12 PM
Remote Name: 128.175.114.68

Objectives

 Students will be able to identify which one of the 5 silent e rules they are using when they sound out and write words  From dictated words, students will be able to apply the 5 silent e rules and decode words by saying the right vowel sounds  Students will be able to read words on sight with fluency, knowing the rules

Rationale

 Students should be able to know when to say short or long vowel sounds when reading  They should know why the letter e is added to the end of certain words  A firm understanding of rules will help with fluency

Content

 The 5 reasons for using the final silent e are: - e after one consonant causes the preceding vowel to be long, ex: dime, tape - e is added after v or single vowel u, ex: have, love - e must follow c and g at the end of a word to retain sounds (s) and (j), ex: dance, hinge - Every syllable must contain at least one vowel, ex: ti tle, pic kle - “no job e” - is added for no apparent reason- it does not effect the sound of the vowel or consonant, ex: sens e, imagin e

Introductory

A. Introductory  I would ask the students if they like poems and rhyming words  I would read a poem that contained different words with the silent e  Tell them that there are 5 different rules to remembering how to sound out these different words

Developmental_Activities

Developmental Activities  I will hold up big flash cards with letters on them that spell out 3 or 4 CVC words and their CVCV long sound – repeating this at beginning of each rule  Ask if anyone sees a pattern or rule on how to make the short vowel a long vowel  Explain that the 1st rule is: final e after one consonant causes the preceding vowel to be long  On the board, I would write CVC words and words that are not CVC words to see if they could put the silent e on the right words according to the rules  EXAMPLE: dim,dime AND bar,bare cvc,cvcv cvc,cvcv  For the next rule, I would spell out another 3 or 4 words and ask what they think a different rule could be for these words  I will explain that English words cannot end with v or single vowel u, so the silent e is added  EXAMPLE: hav, have AND lov, love  Do more on the board with that rule  I would once again spell out 3 or 4 words with the flashcards and ask what the rule could be  Explain that rule #3 states that: the silent e must follow c and g at the end of a word to retain the sounds (s) and (j)  EXAMPLE: chance AND hinge  The fourth rule says that every syllable must contain at least one vowel, so e is added to comply with this rule  EXAMPLE: stable, title, pickle, AND bundle  Do more examples on board  Finally, the last rule is called “no job e”- Adding the e does not effect the sound of the vowel or consonant – The letter e is added for no reason at all  EXAMPLES: engin e, tens e, imagin e, rins e, AND sens e

 

 

 

Closure

Closure  I will review the main point of each rule for the words that have the silent e  Assure them that they will remember these rules as they get older and use them when they don’t know how to pronounce a word with the silent e

 

 

Materials

 Poem using short vowel words and long vowel words with the silent e  Big flashcards that spell out prepared words  Poem of rules for silent e

Lesson_Assessment

 Give poem of rules for the silent e – have to fill in the blanks  Worksheet – pick out silent e words and state which rule it is

 

Comprehension

Student_Teacher: Christine Policastro
Draft: 1
Grade: 2
School: Albert Jones
Date_Received: 4/7/00
Date_Implemented: 4/13/00
Coop_Teacher: Francine Gaines
Approval: Yes
Lesson_Time: 30 minutes
Remote Name: 128.175.52.157

Objectives

* Students will be able to identify the main elements of a story ( main character, setting, plot, conclusion) * Students will be able to tell where the story takes place and when it happens * Students will be able to identify the problem and explain how the characters are trying to solve it * Students will be able to explain how the problem was finally solved and what the main character finds out about himself/herself

Rationale

These goals were chosen because it is necessary for the students to map a story and determine the key elements. The teacher can determine if they understand the story when they respond to the questions linked to the objectives.

Content

The focus of this lesson is to have students identify the main characters, plot and other elements of a story. The teacher will begin by reading a book to the class and asking them to listen to the story and be prepared to answer questions about the elements in it. The students will need to know what pulverize means, so we will discuss this word when we reach it in the reading.

Introductory

The teacher will begin by reading the title of the book and asking students to predict what will happen. The teacher will briefly discuss April Fools Day for any students that may not be familiar with it. Today, we will be focusing on the elements of the story. As I read the story, students will be asked to listen for main characters, setting, plot, problems that occur, and the conclusion.

Developmental_Activities

Teacher will explain to the students that it is important to identify these elements because it helps you to understand the story. As you read, you can listen for them and understand who is doing what and what is actually occurring in the book. Teacher will hand out worksheet (see attached) and the students will be asked to figure out the elements that were in the story that we just finished. This worksheet will allow them to work individually and make sure that they conquer the key elements of a story.

Closure

After this lesson, the students should have a good understanding of the elements that make up a story and how they are related to one another. The students will be told that they will be reading stories on their own and will have to find the character, setting, plot and conclusion. There is another worksheet that allows the students to make up their own story and incorporate the elements themselves. This would be an ideal follow-up assignment.

Materials

Arthur’s April Fool by Marc Brown Worksheets

Lesson_Assessment

After the students complete this hand-out, we will discuss the correct answers. The teacher will not give the students the answers, but ask the students to give their answer and explain why they thought it was the correct answer. Based on their answers, the teacher can tell if the objectives have been met.

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Last changed: September 05, 2001